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Fly Fishing Texas Report 032318 – Weather Says Spring Fish Say Wait a Minute

| March 23, 2018 | 0 Comments

Texas Fly Fishing Report

This is your fresh Texas Fly Fishing Report for the weekend. Remember that you can find more words here than on these videos — I know, that’s a scary thought!

Things are aligning nicely for next week, if we don’t get too much of a good thing (rain forecast). Alas, it is Texas, so bigger, more and too much is probably what we’re in store for. Watch the video, and I will break down the effect massive spring rains have on our fly fishing opportunities – specifically for lakes and ponds. Of course we all know our rivers eventually lead to the Gulf of Mexico, and I will tell you what I have been seeing down on the coast at Port Aransas lately (seeing online).

TEXAS SKIFF LIFE

I finished up wiring in the head unit for the skiff today, and for no good reason, I recorded the video of that final install, and firing up of the tunes. It sounds very good, and does not rattle the boat (if you are worried about crushing bass or too much power to the speakers). When the people who know me best, and who have been on my skiff, say, “YOU NEED! a STEREO!” I was happy to oblige. If it ever gets too loud, let me know!

 

Texas Fly Fishing Report Going Around The Bend and Back Again

| October 27, 2017 | 0 Comments

Waltz Across Texas

Twelve-hundred miles down this week, and I never left Texas. The drive started here in Denton, made the long run to the Rio Grande Valley, and hit the second stop two days ago in Houston before closing the triangle this morning upon return to Denton, Tejas. Heck of a deal … retirement homes, heart hospitals and the like. An old artist friend in the Valley asked where I wanted my angel wings painted. I suggested he paint them on the car.

As we are here to talk fly fishing, fly fishing reports and the like … I best not deviate from the menu you have come to have a taste for over these many years. The last I will say about that journey may sound hokey, and you young bucks I saw at 8th Wonder last night may think I am an old hoot, but I’ll tell you – life goes by in the blink of an eye – just like that birthday I passed on the road this week.

I am not doing a video this week, as the weather is a blustery, misty fifty-degrees out on the Fly Bar, and the morning’s commute from Houston has me bleary-eyed. But we certainly can reprint the parts of the Texas Fly Fishing Report that matter and YOU CERTAINLY can read! I must throw in some conversations from last night at 8th Wonder as well — as those conversations are what really makes this site and the reporting here – REAL and ACCURATE.

STARTING WITH THE SCUTTLEBUTT 

GALVESTON BAY

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with the Galveston Bay System, and it is fishing just like it would without fifty-five inches of rain drained into it. That is good to hear, although we did hear, early-on, about lost grass carp being caught in the bay. With this cold snap, we are setting up nicely for the November flounder run (says I).

GUADALUPE RIVER STRIPER

The most amazing news I had was from the Guadalupe River actually. Huge, and I want to emphasize HUGE striper are being caught along the Guadalupe River. One striper, found dead, came in at 47-pounds. That is no typo – forty-seven Texas, USA, pounds. Teens and twenties are sighted regularly, and being caught on occasion (yes there is photographic evidence on one particular phone). Break out your ten weight, and contact me for the details on the guide doing this with some consistency. These striper have been witnessed eating a c-and-r 20-inch largemouth bass in two bites tail first, so take your woolly buggers with you – and go home.

Although the flows were curtailed over the summer, there are holdover trout in abundance – both brown and rainbow. I saw phone fish porn that would make YOUR heart skip a beat – healthy and colorful trout being caught on the Guadalupe, and some significant stocking of the waters coming VERY SOON this season. This promises to be an epic year on the Guadalupe, and with the continuing “situational” fly fishing in Oklahoma? This should be your year to cash in your boxtops for a Guadalupe River float trip. You’ll be able to go for quantity (if that’s your thing), and in this rare instance, you will have an opportunity for quality as well. I can hook you up with a few guides who are onto these holdovers as well – CONTACT ME.


Last night’s event was a fly tying event put on by Bayou City Angler, and hosted by the 8th Wonder. Thanks once again for the kind and warm reception I once again received from the Houston Bayou City Angler patrons and employees who took the time to talk to me, tell stories and listen to my stories about stories – which I seem to be doing a lot more than casting a fly lately! You guys make me feel welcome and an outing with the Houston crew, Stacy Lynn et. al., is as much of a family feel as I have ever gotten in the fly world. It always seems to lead to some fantastic fly fishing as well!

If you are lucky enough to live near Houston, be sure to visit the fantastic brewery 8th Wonder east of Downtown Houston, Texas. I was able to sample their compliment of beers last night, staying away from those IPA’s so popular with the hipsters, and really enjoyed their “regular” beer offerings. Of course, tonight is game three of the World Series, so I wouldn’t even go close to Minute Maid during the three game close-out of the Dodgers. So, do any of you know what the 8th. Wonder of the world actually is?

ON TO THE REGULAR REPORTING

TEXAS

North Sabine

Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad on soft plastics. Redfish and flounder are good in the marsh on shrimp. Flounder are good on shrimp, shad and Gulps at the mouths of bayous.

South Sabine

Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad. Redfish are good at the jetty on live bait and cracked crabs. Flounder are good on Gulps around marsh drains.

Bolivar

Trout, black drum, sand trout and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. Trout are fair to good while drifting shell on plastics. Bull redfish are good on the beachfront.

Trinity Bay

Trout are good for drifters working pods of shad and mullet on soft plastics and Gulps. Redfish are fair to good on the east and north shorelines on shrimp and Gulps.

East Galveston Bay

Trout and large Gulf trout are good for drifters working deep shell on plastics and fresh shrimp. Redfish and flounder are fair to good in the marsh around drains on shrimp. Trout are good on topwaters for waders working mud and shell.

West Galveston Bay

Bull redfish and flounder are good at San Luis Pass on shrimp and shad. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. Trout are good on topwaters for waders working the shorelines.

Texas City

Gulf trout are good in the channel on fresh shrimp. Redfish are good in Moses Lake on shrimp.

Freeport

Trout and redfish are fair to good on the reefs in Christmas Bay and Bastrop Bay. Bull redfish are good around Surfside and at the Quintana jetty on crabs, shrimp and mullet.

East Matagorda Bay

Trout are good for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell. Trout and flounder are fair to good on muddy shorelines on soft plastics.

West Matagorda Bay

Trout are good on sand and grass humps on soft plastics and topwaters. Redfish are good on live shrimp at Shell Island, Oyster Lake, Crab Lake and Mad Island on the incoming tide.

Port O’connor

Bull redfish are good at the jetty on crabs, mullet and shad. Trout are good on the reefs in San Antonio Bay on live shrimp.

Rockport

Trout are fair in the channel on free–lined shrimp. Redfish are good in Redfish Bay on mullet and crabs. Bull redfish are good in the Lydia Ann Channel and around Mud Island on shrimp and crabs.

Port Aransas

Redfish are fair at Shamrock Cove and Pelican Island on topwaters and Gulps. Bull redfish are good at the jetty and on the beachfront on natural baits.

Corpus Christi

Bull redfish are good in the surf on mullet and shrimp. Trout are fair for waders working mud and grass on Super Spook Jrs and Gulps.

Baffin Bay

Trout are good on topwaters and plum plastics around rocks and grass. Trout are good while drifting deep rocks on plum plastics. Flounder are good in the Land Cut on Gulps and jigs tipped with shrimp.

Port Mansfield

Redfish are good while drifting pot holes on topwaters and soft plastics under a popping cork. Trout and redfish are fair to good on the spoils on small topwaters and gold spoons. Flounder are fair to good at East Cut on Gulps and shrimp.

South Padre

Redfish are good in Airport Cove and on the Gas Well Flats on DOA Shrimp and Gulps. Trout are good on the flats on topwaters with high tides.

Port Isabel

Trout and redfish are good over potholes and grass flats on scented baits and topwaters. Redfish and flounder are fair to good in Cullen Bay on Gulps.

OKLAHOMA

LOWER MOUNTAN FORK
Submitted by:

Mark Hannah

Date:

10/22/2017

Lake Elevation:

Normal

Water Temp and Clarity:

Clear
 
Action: Good
Baits:  Powerbait, Worms
Locations: Shallows
TEXOMA

Submitted by:

Cody Jones

Date:

10/24/2017

Lake Elevation:

Above Average

Water Temp and Clarity:

Murky
 
Action: Good
Baits:  Flukes, Hair Jigs, Shad, Top Water
Locations: Below the dam, Flats, Main lake, Points
 
Action: Good
Baits:  Cut Bait, Dough bait, Punch bait, Shad, Worms
Locations: Main lake, Points, Riprap, River Mouth
 
Action: Fair
Baits:  Jigs, Minnows
Locations: Brush structure, Docks, Main lake, Standing timber
LOWER ILLINOIS

Submitted by:

Warden Jeremy Bersche

Date:

10/22/2017

Lake Elevation:

Normal

Water Temp and Clarity:

65, clear to murky
 
Action: Slow
Baits:  Nymphs, Powerbait
Locations: Below the dam, Spillway, and Watts WMU
 
 

Lower Illinois Additional Information:

Water releases related to generation 1500 to 3000 cfs occur regularly. Since the water runs then is shut off on a regular basis, sometimes daily, this is considered normal elevation. When the main gates are open along with the generators the elevation is considered high. No releases for a long period of time and low water in the Arkansas River, means low water levels in the Lower Illinois. After a water release, the water becomes dingy then settles out and clears. Stocking is still suspended due to water quality conditions.
Be sure to purchase your OKLAHOMA NON-RESIDENT Fishing License before you go!

Coal Burns Out in Texas Water Wednesday

| October 18, 2017 | 0 Comments

Dominoes Begin To Fall In Texas

It may be a brand new day for the Texas environment, and we actually lived to see it happen. Taking three of Texas’ coal powered electricity generating plants offline means cleaner skies for Texas, less fallout in our water and healthier fish.

I have quietly railed against coal for several years now, and do believe that one of the great (maybe history will say the only great) things we will be left with from Obama’s years is – HIS positive impact on the environment, on our environment.

The closing of these plants will cost jobs, just as the horse stables and buggy whip makers lost their jobs with the coming of the horseless carriage. Families will be effected by this, and we cannot underestimate their insecurity and instability in this era of endemic underemployment, insanely low wages and people’s seeming inability to relocate to where jobs really are these days.

However, we rejoice at the idea of cleaner land, water and air – brought about by the huge growth in Texas wind power and natural gas. Texas is number one in the Nation when it comes to wind power, and we got there pretty darn quickly. Now, wind moves up in the percentage of power it supplies, and natural gas is the king of all power supplied in Texas (Yes, T. Boone, there is a Santa Claus).

The plants that are closing are:

  • Monticello
  • Big Brown
  • Sandow

Luminant still has a couple more plants open, and they are:

  • Oak Grove
  • Martin Lake

Closing the above three plants will cut 10-percent of Texas power plant’s carbon dioxide emissions, which amounts to 26-million tons of carbon dioxide annually. Coal has been on a downward trend since 2010 – more than half of the US’s coal powered plants have announced their “retirements” in this decade. In case you’re wondering. That’s a GOOD THING. Let us all just hope that President Trump doesn’t do anything else stupid – to prop up coal power, and just leaves coal as another of his empty promises, this one best left empty. Continue Reading

Texas Fly Fishing Report and Clyde Meets Harvey Slideshow

| October 13, 2017 | 0 Comments

Texas Fly Fishing Report Hurricane Harvey Slideshow

We’re still having trouble with the gutting of the “embed” function of YouTube (proportions may be off), but you get the picture! Thanks for watching, and let me know if you have any questions please! At some point I will be producing another audio based story from the interview I did with Captain Chuck Naiser, but it may be awhile.

Texas Fly Fishing Report – Video With Fly Tying Recommendation Ending

| August 4, 2017 | 0 Comments

Fly Fishing in Texas: The Texas Fly Fishing Report Plus Fly Tying Tip for Texas Saltwater

Thanks for coming to the website! I assume a lot of you arrive here because of the YouTube Texas Fly Fishing Report, and maybe just because of today’s report?

As I said, the reports from TPWD are laced with the words “fair” which is worse than “good,” but better than “slow” — all terms TPWD uses to be intentionally vague, and not influence the economies of businesses that rely on these lakes. Keep that in mind. All-in-all, there are a lot more “fairs” and fewer “goods” and the curse word “slow” is starting to creep in across Texas. We all know that happens. That’s why it’s called fishing.

SALT

I am not even too surprised to see those words creeping into the saltwater reports either. Heat, and indeterminate wind patterns make things on the coast a bit tepid. The fish begin to spread out, and seek deeper climes. Again, normal. Take the tide-moon phase right now, and I would say – GO TAKE A NAP instead.

REMEMBER

Please remember a couple of things about the reports I do:

  • Almost all of this is gleaned and then combined in one place – HERE
  • If what you get (on your outing) isn’t close to what’s reported here? You HAVE to tell us so that we can adjust. CALL OUT bad information!
  • I will tell you what I NOW FOR SURE
  • This information is based on conventional fishermen reporting on conventional tactics
  • It is up to us to translate this into fly information – for example … watch the video for a killer saltwater fly sample at the end of this week’s video

WHAT I KNOW FOR SURE – Local Fly Fishing Scene Heats up Again

What I know about the water I guide on FOR SURE is that there are tons of catfish (heat resistant) on the flats at Lake Ray Roberts. I was out scouting yesterday, and besides the information that follows, I caught a twisted up three-pound slimeball on a black/black Clouser while prospecting for early bass.

SPEAKING OF BASS

All size bass are roving the flats right now! It’s more a matter of the lack of a winter (in my opinion), than the environment – I think their internal clocks are set ahead by about six weeks! I see yearlings in schools marauding, and see good size bass prowling solo. They’re hard to spot, but easy to catch, and will take the time to pursue the smallest fly if it looks worthy.

And of carp? Here is what I think is happening, with the gift of the most abundant carp population in ten years, there’s another edge to the sword. These fish came in, spawned and relaxed, then ate / cleared all (and I MEAL ALL) that grassy vegetation that lined the bottom of flats like Lantana Flats. Once that food was gone, it also coincided with the heat coming on – just a coincidence really.

SO, the fish would come up and look around when it was cool, looking for that grass they like. And, when they found little to none, they would drop off again for the day’s heat.

WELL, that vegetation has grown back! And they’re already back mowing it down en masse. Yesterday, Thursday, August 3, I saw those early season carp’n chains (plays in my imagination as “tarpon chains”), feeders are everywhere, but they are retracing their early behaviors as well – skittish and easily spooked. The numbers are very, very good right now. I also believe the break in the heat helps, but consider the fact that as I was idling in to the cove, there was that telltale grass floating (after being mowed by carp) everywhere — just as in spring / early summer.

So I think we are going to have another valhalla that goes from now until they get it all mowed down again. I believe carp will endure the heat for the eat. But once the eat is gone, they’ll be off again too. Allez bon ton roule.

PS – The YouTube Video for this report contains a recommended Texas saltwater fly that should be very hot right now – based on conventional reports.

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